©2018 by Kara Stevick.

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EPISODES 

This week’s episode features a conversation with Jennifer Kyker, an associate professor of music and of ethnomusicology at the University of Rochester. We talk about the mbira, an instrument you’ll hear featured in this week’s episode. Kyker is the author of a book on popular music in postcolonial Zimbabwe, Oliver Mtukudzi: Living Tuku Music in Zimbabwe, published by Indiana University Press.

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A CONVERSATION WITH JENNIFER KYKER ABOUT THE MBIRA, GENDER, AND MORE

For the first time ever, Kim and Rachel are together to record this week’s episode, which includes a conversation with Northwestern University’s Evan Mwangi. Professor Mwangi talks about his most recent book, Translation in African Contexts, and the debates about literature in African languages.

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A CONVERSATION WITH EVAN MWANGI ON TRANSLATIONS, LITERATURE IN AFRICAN LANGUAGES, AND MORE

In this week’s episode we talk about elections in Madagascar, Togo, and especially the Democratic Republic of Congo. Our guest is Laura Seay (@texasinafrica), a political scientist at Colby College and an expert on Congolese politics. She offers some background for our listeners on the delayed elections in Congo that are now scheduled to be held on December 30. 

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A CONVERSATION WITH LAURA SEAY ON THE UPCOMING DRC ELECTIONS AND “2 MINUTE AFRICAN POLITICS”

This week’s episode begins with a discussion of protests and repression in Zimbabwe, the terror attack in Nairobi, Kenya, Senegal’s upcoming election, and the re-launch of the Africa Online Digital Library. Our guest this week is Beth Whitaker, an associate professor of political science at the University of North Carolina Charlotte. Her research examines migration and security issues in Africa. 

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A CONVERSATION WITH BETH WHITAKER ON AFRICA’S INTERNATIONAL 

RELATIONS

For this week’s conversation, Rachel spoke with Dr. Anta Sané and Dr. Ndongo Samba Sylla about the upcoming elections in Senegal. 

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A conversation with Dr. Anta Sané and Dr. Ndongo Symba Sylla about the Senegalese elections

This week’s episode features a lot of discussion on North Africa. In the news wrap, we cover the protests in Algeria and Sudan (as well as election results in Senegal and Nigeria). Our featured conversation for this week’s episode is with Matt Buehler, an assistant professor of political science at the University of Tennessee and Global Security Fellow at the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy. 

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A conversation with Matt Buehler on how governments spoil opposition alliances in North Africa

We begin this week’s episode discussing protests and democracy in Benin, the damage from Cyclone Idai in Mozambique, Malawi, and Zimbabwe, and the consequences of climate change more broadly. Our featured conversation is with Khalid Medani, an Associate Professor of Political Science and Islamic Studies and the Chair of the African Studies Program at McGill University. He has published widely on the on the roots of civil conflict and the funding of the Islamic movement in Sudan, the question of informal finance and terrorism in Somalia, the obstacles to state building in Iraq, and the role of informal networks in the rise of Islamic militancy. He provides insights on the current protests in Sudan and puts them in context.

Listen here. 

A conversation with Khalid Medani on protests in Sudan

We start our episode this week talking about recent pieces on Sudan published in The Monkey Cage, the row between Uganda and Rwanda, African migrants stuck in Mexico, and the latest on events in Mali. This week’s conversation is with Jeffrey Paller (@JWPaller), an assistant professor of politics at the University of San Francisco. He was formerly a fellow at the Earth Institute at Columbia University and a Research Associate at the Center for Democratic Development in Ghana. Our listeners might be familiar with Jeffrey’s weekly news bulletin, This Week in Africa. We spoke with him about his new book, published this week, Democracy in Ghana: Everyday Politics in Urban Africa.

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A conversation with Jeffrey Paller on urban politics, democracy in Ghana, and more

We start out episode this week talking about politics in Mali, South Africa’s recent election and give you an update on the political situation in Uganda. We talk about the arrest earlier this week in Kenya of Boniface Mwangi, who we spoke with on our podcast during episode 35. This week’s conversation is with Dr. Maggie Dwyer (@MagDwyer), a Lecturer in Africa and International Development at the University of Edinburgh. Her research focuses on conflict, security, and politics in Africa. She is particularly interested in militaries and international security interventions and we talk to her about her book, Soldiers in Revolt: Army Mutinies in Africa, published last year by Oxford University Press. Maggie earned her Ph.D. at the University of Edinburgh and holds an MSc from Syracuse University and a BS from the University of Mary Washington. Before becoming an academic, Maggie had a previous career working for the U.S. Department of Defense.

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A conversation with Maggie Dwyer about army mutinies in Africa, and more

In this week’s episode, we talk about Malawi’s elections, the passing of Binyavanga Wainaina, and ethnic violence and displacement in Ethiopia. Our featured conversation is with Ato Kwamena Onoma, a political scientist currently serving as a senior program officer at the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (@CODESRIA). He is also the author of two books, Anti-Refugee Violence and African Politics and The Politics of Property Rights Institutions in Africa, both published by Cambridge University Press.

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A conversation with Ato Kwamena Onoma on property rights, refugees, and more

In this episode of Ufahamu Africa, we talk about a new West African currency, media freedom in Tanzania, and an Ethiopian satellite that will launch soon. This week’s featured conversation is with Dr. Anthonia Kalu, a professor of comparative literature and gender and sexuality studies at UC Riverside. In our chat we talk about kola nuts, cross-cultural digital possibilities, writing, and African storytelling.

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A CONVERSATION WITH ANTHONIA KALU ON WRITING AND AFRICAN STORYTELLING

Don’t miss our first episode featuring an interview conducted at the African Studies Association annual meeting last week. We chat with George Bob-Milliar and Lauren MacLean about recent student protests at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST).

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A CONVERSATION WITH GEORGE BOB-MILLIAR AND LAUREN MACLEAN ABOUT STUDENT PROTESTS AT KNUST IN GHANA

We begin this week’s episode with a conversation about elections slated for 2019, and important developments in the elections in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We also talk about current protests in Senegal and Sudan, which suits our conversation with this week’s guest, Lisa Mueller, an assistant professor of political science at Macalester College in Saint Paul Minnesota. Lisa is the author of a new book published by Cambridge University Press: Political Protest in Contemporary Africa.

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A CONVERSATION WITH LISA MUELLER ON PROTESTS IN AFRICA

In this week’s episode, we talk about Jaimie Bleck's latest book, written with Nicolas van de Walle, Electoral Politics in Africa Since 1990: Continuity in Change. From her new book, we learn about common trends among African candidates, African voters’ priorities, and the issues candidates campaign on in African elections. She also tells us about an exciting project she worked on with Malian musicians live-scoring a silent film, “The Passion of Joan of Arc” at Notre Dame.

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A conversation with Jaimie Bleck on elections in Africa, music in Mali, and more

Nigeria’s elections have been postponed, but that didn’t keep us from sharing our insightful conversation with Nicholas Kerr this week. Nicholas is an assistant professor of comparative politics in the Department of Political Science at the University of Florida. We talk about his research on electoral management bodies in Africa and in particular about his research on election management and popular perceptions of election quality in Nigeria.

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A conversation with Nicholas Kerr about Nigerian elections, citizens’ opinions about election quality, and more

This week’s episode kicks off Women’s History Month and celebrates International Women’s Day, starting with a conversation about women’s protest participation in Algeria and women’s representation in politics in Africa more broadly. We also highlight critiques of the theme for International Women’s Day 2019: #BalanceForBetter.Our conversation is with Professor Nyokabi Kamau, who is the Executive Director of the Centre for Parliamentary Studies and Training in Kenya. The conversation was part of a global salon hosted at the Lewis Global Studies Center in 2018 and was facilitated by Smith College Professor of Comparative Literature Katwiwa Mule. They talk about Kamau’s new book, Conversations about Gender: The Reflections of a Kenyan Feminist.

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A conversation with Nyokabi Kamau on feminism in Kenya

We begin this week’s episode talking about the resignation of Algerian president Bouteflika, mistrust challenging response to the Ebola outbreak in Eastern Congo, and we mark the 25th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide.

This week’s conversation is with Muna Ndulo, the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of International & Comparative Law at Cornell Law School. Professor Ndulo is an expert on constitution making, governance and institution building, international criminal law, African legal systems, and human rights.

We begin this week’s episode talking about the resignation of Algerian president Bouteflika, mistrust challenging response to the Ebola outbreak in Eastern Congo, and we mark the 25th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide.

This week’s conversation is with Muna Ndulo, the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of International & Comparative Law at Cornell Law School. Professor Ndulo is an expert on constitution making, governance and institution building, international criminal law, African legal systems, and human rights.

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A conversation with Muna Ndulo on international financial transparency, investment vs. insurgency, and more

We begin this week’s episode talking about Benin politics, a Malawian musician, the deployment of a malaria vaccine, a Russian company’s involvement in Sudan’s response to protesters, and the 25th anniversary of South Africa’s elections ending the Apartheid regime.

This week we feature a conversation with Abdourahmane Seck, an anthropologist and historian at the Faculty of Civilizations, Religions, Arts and Communication at the Université Gaston Berger in Saint-Louis, Senegal. Dr. Seck is the author of several works on Islam and south-south migration. He is currently a visiting scholar in the Institute for the Study of Islamic Thought in Africa, part of the Buffett Institute for Global Affairs at Northwestern University.

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A conversation with Abdourahmane seck on Islam, modernity, and more

We start this week’s conversation with an update on the South African elections but turn our focus to Malawi, which is scheduled to hold elections on Tuesday. We also talk about Facebook and fake news in African elections. Our featured conversation is with Dr. Boniface Dulani (@bonidulani), a Senior Lecturer in Political Science at the University of Malawi, the fieldwork operations manager for Afrobarometer and senior partner of the Institute of Public Opinion and Research in Malawi. He shares his expertise in Malawian politics, especially with respect to the coming elections. 

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 A conversation with Boniface Dulani on Malawi’s elections, chieftaincy, and more

We begin this week’s episode announcing an exciting collaboration with The Monkey Cage (@monkeycageblog) to feature bonus content each Monday morning — a weekly reading of a book review from TMC’s African Politics Summer Reading Spectacular (#APSRS19). Tune in on Monday!

The news we cover this week includes recent events in Sudan, Kehinde Wiley’s artist residency in Dakar, a nuclear project irradiating tsetse flies, and more.

Our featured conversation is with Erin Pettigrew, an assistant professor of History and Arab Crossroads Studies at NYU Abu Dhabi. Her research focuses on 19th and 20th century West Africa and histories of Islam, race, and healing in colonial and postcolonial contexts. Their conversation touches on how people deal with change over time, including practices involving the spiritual realm, which draws on what Erin learned in working on her exciting book project, To Invoke the Invisible: Islam, Spiritual Mediation, and Social Change in the Sahara. They also talk about Erin’s next book project on the history of a leftist political movement in Mauritania. 

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A conversation with Erin Pettigrew on Muslim spiritual mediators, locally relevant research, and more

In this week’s episode, we talk about conflict in Cameroon, work by the writer Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, land restitution in South Africa, and Nanjala Nyabola’s new book. This week’s featured conversation is with Abdulbasit Kassim, who visited Northwestern University’s Institute for the Study of Islamic Thought in Africa earlier this week. 

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A CONVERSATION WITH ABDULBASIT KASSIM ON RELIGION, BOKO HARAM, AND MORE

In this week’s episode, we talk about Google’s top search items in African countries in 2018, how Kenyans did in the Singapore marathon, Trump’s new Africa policy, and more. Our featured conversation is with Boston University political scientist Michael Woldemariam (@MikeWoldemariam), who shares his expertise on the Horn of Africa region, where he has conducted extensive fieldwork.

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A CONVERSATION WITH MICHAEL WOLDEMARIAM ON THE POLITICAL SHAKEUP IN THE HORN OF AFRICA

This week’s episode begins with discussion over the contested elections and recent result announcement in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and a coup attempt by junior military officers in Gabon. Our episode features a conversation with Matthew Page (@MatthewTPage), an associate fellow at Chatham House and formerly the U.S. intelligence community’s top Nigeria expert. 

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A CONVERSATION WITH MATTHEW PAGE ON THE UPCOMING NIGERIAN ELECTIONS

In this week’s episode, we speak with Ashley Currier, Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Cincinnati. We asked her about her new book, Politicizing Sex in Contemporary Africa: Homophobia in Malawi. Her first book, Out in Africa: LGBT Organizing in Namibia and South Africa, was a finalist for a 2013 Lambda Literary Book Award.

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A conversation with Ashley Currier on LGBTQ organizing in Africa

This week’s conversation is with Wendell Marsh (@theafrabian), an Assistant Professor of African American and African Studies at Rutgers University-Newark and Postdoctoral Fellow at the Buffet Institute for Global Studies at Northwestern University. He conducts research and teaches on the encounter of Islam and the African world as mediated in Arabic and vernacular texts.  

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A conversation with Wendell Marsh on the history (and modernity) of Islam and the African world

This week’s episode begins with discussion of events in DRC, Malawi, and Algeria. We also talk about a new study showing how democracy is good for our health. Our featured conversation is with Sally Nuamah, an assistant professor at Duke University’s Sanford School of Public Policy. Her research sits at the intersections of race, gender, public education and political behavior. She made the award-winning film, HerStory. We talk with Sally about her first book, How Girls Achieve, released this week by Harvard University Press.

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A conversation with Sally Nuamah on girls’ education

In this week’s episode, we talk about Saharan Futures, protests and political change in Sudan, political maneuvering in Senegal, and what Cyclone Idai teaches us about the governance of disasters and in urban spaces.

Our featured guest this week is Hannah Armstrong (@brkinibeachriot), the Senior Sahel consultant at the International Crisis Group. She has worked across North Africa and the Sahel as a writer and researcher for various publications and organizations since 2006. She served as a Fulbright fellow in Morocco and as a fellow of the Institute of Current World Affairs in Niger, Mali, Mauritania, Burkina Faso, Algeria, and the Western Sahara from 2012 to 2014.  Rachel spoke with Hannah earlier this week when she was visiting Chicago from Dakar, where she is based. 

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A conversation with Hannah Armstrong on politics in Algeria, the Sahel, illicit trafficking and borders

Our show this week begins with the elections in Benin, peacekeeping in Liberia, elections in South Africa and Malawi, and the Caster Semenya gender and racing saga. We also share an update on Ugandan musician-turned-politician Bobi Wine.

This week’s in-depth conversation is really special: it features a mashup of four podcasts: Ufahamu Africa, On Africa, Into Africa, and African Tech Roundup. The hosts of all four shows come together to talk about a few things, including why we launched our respective shows. In addition to Ufahamu Africa’s hosts Kim Yi Dionne and Rachel Beatty Riedl, you’ll hear Travis Adkins (@TravisLAdkins), adjunct professor at Georgetown University in African Studies and Security Studies and the host of On Africa; Judd Devermont (@JDevermont), the director of the Africa Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and host of Into Africa, and Andile Masuku (@MasukuAndile), a Zimbabwean broadcaster and entrepreneur based in Johannesburg, South Africa and host of African Tech Roundup. We all owe a big thanks to Judd and his team at CSIS for hosting this mashup, which begins at 12:55.

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An Africa podcast mashup

We begin this week’s episode discussing protests and democracy in Benin, the damage from Cyclone Idai in Mozambique, Malawi, and Zimbabwe, and the consequences of climate change more broadly. Our featured conversation is with Khalid Medani, an Associate Professor of Political Science and Islamic Studies and the Chair of the African Studies Program at McGill University. He has published widely on the on the roots of civil conflict and the funding of the Islamic movement in Sudan, the question of informal finance and terrorism in Somalia, the obstacles to state building in Iraq, and the role of informal networks in the rise of Islamic militancy. He provides insights on the current protests in Sudan and puts them in context.

Listen here. 

A conversation with Khalid Medani on protests in Sudan